Rio Grande Valley Politics

Politics in the Rio Grande Valley “RGV” is shaped in large part by the large Hispanic population and illegal alien presence. The counties in the RGV vote mainly vote  Democratic because their political views are more socialist. A small portion people vote and identify with Republican politics. Most local political elections do not even have a Republican opponents on the ballot. RGV politics and social beliefs of the population have contributed to it’s lower economic standing in the state.

The high illegal alien population has taken a lot of jobs from people who normally would be working. Examples are found in construction, restaurants, lawn service and maid services. No taxes are paid or taken from these illegal aliens and they are paid “under the table”. Their kids go to public schools and if they have children born in the United States they get food stamps because they claim no income.

These counties are one of the poorest in the state with one of the largest unemployment rates in the state of Texas.The chart below only show the major metropolitan city it is far worst in the small communities.

The Texas Labor Market & Career Information Data for September was released on Friday, October 20, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. (CDT).

Civilian Labor Force Estimates for Texas Metropolitan Statistical Areas Not Seasonally Adjusted (In Thousands)
August 2017 July 2017 August 2016
C.L.F. Emp. Unemp. Rate C.L.F. Emp. Unemp. Rate C.L.F. Emp. Unemp. Rate
United States 160,863.0 153,576.0 7,287.0 4.5 161,911.0 154,470.0 7,441.0 4.6 159,800.0 151,804.0 7,996.0 5.0
Texas 13,406.8 12,802.0 604.8 4.5 13,434.6 12,850.6 584.0 4.3 13,295.2 12,639.0 656.2 4.9
Abilene 73.6 70.6 3.0 4.1 73.8 70.9 2.9 4.0 74.3 71.2 3.1 4.2
Amarillo 131.4 127.3 4.1 3.1 131.7 127.5 4.2 3.2 130.8 126.4 4.3 3.3
Austin-Round Rock 1,126.1 1,088.3 37.8 3.4 1,132.3 1,095.9 36.4 3.2 1,110.4 1,072.2 38.2 3.4
Beaumont-Port Arthur 171.3 158.9 12.3 7.2 171.4 159.6 11.7 6.8 173.2 160.2 13.0 7.5
Brownsville-Harlingen 167.5 155.3 12.3 7.3 167.4 155.6 11.8 7.0 166.7 154.1 12.6 7.5
College Station-Bryan 124.0 119.5 4.5 3.6 124.4 120.1 4.4 3.5 121.2 116.2 4.9 4.1
Corpus Christi 208.2 196.1 12.1 5.8 207.9 196.5 11.4 5.5 205.0 192.2 12.8 6.2
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington 3,773.6 3,626.8 146.7 3.9 3,782.9 3,641.3 141.6 3.7 3,699.8 3,549.5 150.3 4.1
    Dallas-Plano-Irving MD 2,547.0 2,448.6 98.3 3.9 2,550.4 2,455.7 94.7 3.7 2,494.0 2,394.9 99.1 4.0
    Fort Worth-Arlington MD 1,226.6 1,178.2 48.4 3.9 1,232.5 1,185.6 46.9 3.8 1,205.8 1,154.6 51.2 4.2
El Paso 355.5 338.4 17.1 4.8 355.9 339.4 16.5 4.6 351.0 332.4 18.6 5.3
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land 3,307.7 3,137.2 170.6 5.2 3,319.7 3,157.0 162.7 4.9 3,286.9 3,099.0 187.9 5.7
Killeen-Temple 178.7 171.1 7.6 4.2 178.9 171.5 7.4 4.1 175.4 167.2 8.2 4.6
Laredo 113.6 108.6 5.0 4.4 114.3 109.5 4.8 4.2 113.5 107.7 5.8 5.2
Longview 96.7 91.7 5.0 5.2 96.7 91.8 4.9 5.1 98.6 91.8 6.8 6.9
Lubbock 160.0 154.2 5.8 3.6 159.3 153.5 5.8 3.6 158.7 152.8 5.8 3.7
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission 335.1 308.4 26.7 8.0 334.2 308.7 25.5 7.6 333.9 306.2 27.7 8.3
Midland 86.4 83.6 2.8 3.2 86.8 84.0 2.8 3.2 86.5 82.4 4.1 4.7
Odessa 74.0 70.8 3.2 4.3 74.2 71.1 3.1 4.2 75.4 70.1 5.3 7.0
San Angelo 53.7 51.6 2.1 3.8 53.6 51.6 2.1 3.9 54.8 52.2 2.6 4.8
San Antonio-New Braunfels 1,156.4 1,113.3 43.1 3.7 1,155.1 1,112.8 42.3 3.7 1,140.4 1,095.1 45.3 4.0
Sherman-Denison 61.7 59.4 2.3 3.7 61.7 59.5 2.2 3.5 61.2 58.7 2.4 4.0
Texarkana 64.5 61.5 3.0 4.7 65.0 61.9 3.0 4.7 65.2 61.9 3.2 5.0
Tyler 106.7 102.4 4.3 4.1 107.3 103.1 4.2 3.9 106.3 101.0 5.3 5.0
Victoria 46.7 44.4 2.3 4.8 46.5 44.3 2.2 4.7 47.2 44.4 2.8 6.0
Waco 121.9 116.5 5.4 4.5 122.7 117.2 5.4 4.4 122.9 117.7 5.2 4.2
Wichita Falls 62.9 60.4 2.5 3.9 63.3 60.9 2.5 3.9 63.9 61.0 2.9 4.5

Taking each metro area’s unemployment stats year-by-year, the McAllen-Edinburg and Brownsville-Harlingen metro areas make up 12 of the state’s 25 worst years by metro area, including 10 of the worst 14.

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